Housing

Urban Pathways Opens Independent Housing Named After Former Board Member Howard Amron

Howard Amron's widow, Joan Amron cuts the ribbon for the Howard Amron House with Council Ben Kallos, Urban Pathways CEO Fred Shack, family and board members looking on.  

Howard Amron's widow, Joan Amron cuts the ribbon for the Howard Amron House with Council Ben Kallos, Urban Pathways CEO Fred Shack, family and board members looking on.  

On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, Urban Pathways hosted an open house in celebration of their newly constructed residence, the Howard Amron House on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

The 11-unit building, and the 11th supportive housing facility operated by Urban Pathways, will be home to formerly homeless individuals living at the highest level of independence. The Howard Amron House will offer tenants supportive services including case management, as well as individualized services to maximize independence, and wellness self-management.

Extell Development Company is proud to have developed the property for Urban Pathways. The 7-story building is comprised of 100% permanently affordable supportive housing units. All 11 apartments are private and come fully furnished complete with full kitchens, cookware and tableware, and bed and bath linens.

Frederick Shack, Chief Executive Officer of Urban Pathways expressed “These units were created for formerly homeless individuals who no longer need onsite services and who have demonstrated their ability to live independently. Howard Amron’s legacy of being an advocate for those less fortunate is embodied in the building that now holds his name.”

Named in memory of former Board of Directors Member and Officer Howard C. Amron for his nearly 20 years of service to Urban Pathways; President Emeritus, and friend, Gerry Blume reflected, “I am honored to be here to remember Howard, and I know that, given the kind of man he was, he would say that there is no better way to acknowledge him than to do so by helping others.”

Urban Pathways has identified all tenants and expects the Howard Amron House to be fully occupied by the end of June 2018. If you are interested in furnishing an apartment for a tenant, click here

About Urban Pathways
Urban Pathways is a New York City-based, nonprofit organization that provides housing and support to homeless and at-risk adults throughout the New York Metropolitan area.  Urban Pathways serves more than 2,500 homeless individuals a year and provides transitional, extended stay and permanent housing to chronically homeless individuals. www.urbanpathways.org. Donate

John is "Moving On" to his own apartment!

John Burnett is a participant in Urban Pathways' Moving On Initiative 

John Burnett is a participant in Urban Pathways' Moving On Initiative 

Born in Augusta, Georgia and raised in the Bronx, John is the oldest of eight children.

After high school, John held various jobs including: caterer, grounds keeper and nursing assistant,  among others. These jobs took John through East Coast states like Maryland, South Carolina, and Georgia during the 80s, 90s. He settling in New York in the early 2000s.

While living in Hunt’s Point, John’s building was condemned without warning following the landlord being convicted of drug charges.

John was never able to retrieve his belongings and was homeless for the next two years.

During this time John couch-surfed with family while falling into a deeper depression that he had been able to manage before becoming homeless. As his depression worsened, John’s drinking and drug use increased. Over the next two years, John migrated back through various East Coast states staying with family and friends. 

In 2013 John entered a Bronx Works program and stayed there for two years fighting depression and drug and alcohol addiction until his supervisor suggested detox.

In 2015 John entered detox, and says those next 31 days were the best of his life. They led to him quitting drugs and alcohol for good.

After finishing detox, John came to Urban Pathways. During that time he enrolled in and graduated from the six-month Howie The Harp peer advocate program. John continues to be drug and alcohol free, living at an Urban Pathways' supportive housing residence, Cluster House on the Upper West Side. John is now a certified peer specialist working at The Bridge: a treatment center for individuals recovering from alcohol and drug abuse; as well as mental illness.

John will be moving into his own condo in Parkchester later this month as part of Urban Pathways Moving On Initiative.

Learn more about John’s pathway to independent housing through Urban Pathways at this year’s Way Home Awards & Gala on May 10th at 6pm.

About Urban Pathways
Urban Pathways is a New York City-based, nonprofit organization that provides housing and support to homeless and at-risk adults throughout the New York Metropolitan area.  Urban Pathways serves more than 2,500 homeless individuals a year and provides transitional, extended stay and permanent housing to chronically homeless individuals. www.urbanpathways.org. Donate

 

Eli Carter: From Homelessness to Housing and Advocacy

Eli Carter, formerly homeless resident of Urban Pathways' Safe Haven

Eli Carter, formerly homeless resident of Urban Pathways' Safe Haven

Born in Pensacola Florida, Eli moved to New York for work after finishing highschool in 1963.

Soon after arriving in New York Eli found a job working in a printing press. He worked at the same company for 40 years until his retirement, moving up from an associate to printing manager.

During this time Mr. Carter was living in Brooklyn in a house where he rented a room. He lived at this location until he was told to leave by the police as the owner of the house had not been paying the mortgage thus leaving Mr. Carter homeless.

For 2 years, Eli lived in Penn Station relying on his social security income (that was direct deposited to his card) to survive.

He only left Penn Station to get food, and never got on the trains or went to a city shelter as he had heard horror stories about men and women being abused and taken advantage of.

Eli kept all his important documents with him in a folder and never let it out of his sight. When he was approached by Urban Pathways outreach team about the Olivieri Drop-In Center he was naturally hesitant thinking the location was the same as a city shelter.

After 3 months of continuous outreach Mr. Carter finally agreed to go to The Olivieri Drop-In Center where he started working towards acquiring housing and stability.

The Antonio Olivieri Drop-In Center 

The Antonio Olivieri Drop-In Center 

Since Eli had all his personal documents and information with him he was able to speed up the process of gaining housing faster than most at-risk and homeless individuals usually do.

Mr. Carter moved into Urban Pathways’ Safe Haven residence in Brooklyn a little over 2 years after losing his apartment. In early 2017, Mr. Carter moved into his own apartment in Harlem with the help of the staff at Urban Pathways. He never forgets how helpful the Safe Haven staff was and credits them for getting him stabilized and back on his feet.

Hegeman Safe Haven In Brooklyn 

Hegeman Safe Haven In Brooklyn 

The staff at Hegeman was always there for me when I needed them. They helped me find my own apartment. They were so helpful in making sure I had everything I needed and that I found a studio apartment somewhere that was comfortable and that I was sure would work for me.”

Now, Eli lives comfortably in his studio apartment where he watches his grandchildren after school and continues to stay in touch with his 3 children who live in various parts of the city.

He also travels back to Florida where he still has family he keeps in touch with.

Eli has also become active in Urban Pathways Peer Advocacy headed by Nicole Bramstedt, Director of Policy at Urban Pathways.

When I was working and living in my room, I would always empathize with the homeless. I would give them any food or drink that I had, and I would even buy people food if they asked.

Once I became homeless, I saw so many things wrong with the systems in place to help at-risk and homeless men and women. Once I was able to stabilize in the Safe Haven, I joined Nicole’s advocacy group to help bring an increased awareness to the plight of the homeless, and to use my experience living in the street to help those who are where I used to be.

The advocacy group has been instrumental in giving me a voice to talk to community leaders, politicians, and other formerly homeless individuals. I feel like this is my calling now, when I encounter a homeless person I try and talk to them about my experience and the fact that I now have my own apartment.

I think continuing to spread the word about organizations like Urban Pathways can only help those who need it most.

About Urban Pathways
Urban Pathways is a New York City-based, nonprofit organization that provides housing and support to homeless and at-risk adults throughout the New York Metropolitan area.  Urban Pathways serves more than 2,000 homeless individuals a year and provides transitional, extended stay and permanent housing to chronically homeless individuals. www.urbanpathways.org. Donate

Integrating Healthcare into Housing: Urban Pathways x ACL Conference

The Association for Community Living (ACL) is a statewide membership organization of not-for-profit agencies that provide housing and rehabilitation services to over 30,000 people diagnosed with serious and persistent psychiatric disabilities.

The day-to-day rehabilitative and support activities performed in community residential and other housing settings are vital for people who face the daily challenges of living with a psychiatric disability, but who want to live independent, productive and satisfying lives as members of the community.

The ACL held its 38th annual conference in Bolton Landing New York from November 1st- November 3rd. There were 10-15 panel discussions on various Mental Health Services topics. Urban Pathways presented a panel on Integrating Healthcare into Housing: The Creation of a Staffed Wellness Program in a Housing Setting

With foundation support, Urban Pathways developed and implemented a Medical Wellness program at two of its Supportive Housing residences to help tenants with histories of homelessness, mental health and substance abuse issues, improve their health and healthcare utilization.

With a large number of medical incidents, and high-volume users of medical and emergency services, this program is designed to ultimately reduce reliance on expensive emergency room treatment. Urban Pathways’ Medical Wellness program connects its tenants to a community-based source of primary health care; educates tenants in the appropriate use of health care resources; and educates staff on ways to assist tenants with navigating the health care system. 

This panel was presented by Urban Pathways Chief Compliance Officer Natalie Huntley-Hyman, Medication Room Coordinator Irene Treadwell, Program Director of Clinton/Boston Road Apartments, and CEO Frederick Shack (not pictured). 

About Urban Pathways
Urban Pathways is a New York City-based, nonprofit organization that provides housing and support to homeless and at-risk adults throughout the New York Metropolitan area.  Urban Pathways serves more than 2,000 homeless individuals a year and provides transitional, extended stay and permanent housing to chronically homeless individuals. www.urbanpathways.org